HIST-4370
 

INTELLECTUAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY OF MODERN EUROPE

COURSE INFORMATION Instructor ....................... Roy J. deCarvalho, Ph.D.
Office .............................. Wooten Hall, Room 238
Telephone ....................... 565-4209 or 565-2288 (messages)
E-mail address ............... roy@unt.edu
Home page ..................... http://courses.unt.edu/rdecarvalho
Office hours ................... (R) 5:30-6:30 pm
Course schedule ............ (R) 6:30-9:20 pm
Classroom Location ....... Wooten Hall, Room 215
Course Home Page......... http://courses.unt.edu/rdecarvalho/h4370/syl.htm
COURSE DESCRIPTION From the Scientific and French revolutions; romanticism, reform movements, realism, science and technology, and intellectual currents of the 20th century.
OBJECTIVES & OUTCOMES The objective of the course is to acquaint students with Modern European politics, ethnic diversity and intellectual currents. The major periods, events and historiographical perspectives will be covered and the most important details of each will be discussed. The course seeks to foster intellectual appreciation of historical events and processes and the particularity of European cultural and intellectual life. In so doing, it is expected to develop students' critical and analytical skills and make them better world citizens. The achievement of the course's objectives will be evaluated with exams and a written assignment.
REQUIREMENTS Students are required to attend the lectures, read the textbook, take examinations, and write a book review. The textbook does not repeat the material of the lectures word for word but rather digress into related topics. There will be three mid-terms and a final examinations. Reading and comprehension of the textbook will be evaluated in all exams. Students are encouraged to visit the instructor during his office hours even if they are not experiencing difficulties.

First mid-term:  February 15  (Perry's Intellectual History, chs. 1-6)
Second mid-term:  March 29
(Perry's Intellectual History, chs. 7-9)
Third (final) mid-term: May 10 
(Perry's Intellectual History, chs. 10-12)

BOOK REVIEW ASSIGNMENT Students are expected to read a course related book of their choice and write a book review. Instead of being told precisely what to read students are encouraged to read and write about a topic they find meaningful. Students must receive my approval of their choice before they start reading. Students must restrict their choices to works related to the material of the textbook and lectures. They are encouraged to chose works they find meaningful; works they have always wanted to read but did not have the opportunity to do it. This exercise should be above all a rewarding intellectual experience. 
TEXTBOOK Marvin Perry, An Intellectual History of Modern Europe (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1992)
ATTENDANCE POLICY Students may miss up to three scheduled class meeting.  Students who miss more than three classes will be penalized five points per missed class. Penalty points will be deducted from final grade.

Make-up exams are granted only when agreed upon by the instructor before the exam takes place and only in cases of medical or family emergencies (evidence required in order to document the emergency).  Medical and family emergencies should be reported when possible before the exam to the instructor's e-mail (roy@unt.edu), office (940-565-4209) or messages (940-565-2288) phone numbers.

SPECIAL ACCOMMODATION REQUEST PROCEDURE Any person with special circumstances covered by the American with Disabilities Act should register with the office of Disability Accommodation, Suite 318A, University Union Building, and also inform the instructor of this class. Reasonable adjustment will be made to accommodate the special needs of students with disabilities where such adjustments are necessary to provide equality of educational access.
TENTATIVE LECTURE TOPICS THE SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION

Newton's achievement
Pre-Copernican astronomy and physics
Nicolau Copernicus (1473-1543)
Copernicanism: Brahe, Kepler, Galileo
Descartes' Mechanical Philosophy
Newton's grand synthesis

THE ENLIGHTENMENT AND THE AGE OF REASON

Prophets of the Age of Reason: Locke, Hume and Kant
The ideas of nature, reason, progress, and perfection
On the origins of society: Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau
The Ancient Regime and the French Revolution

ROMANTICISM AND THE EMERGENCE OF HISTORY

The romantic outlook and its expression
Kant and the renewal of metaphysics
Hegel and the dialectics of history
Marx and dialectical materialism

THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION

On the relationship between science, technology and society
The new technology and the steam engine
The steam engine: Savery, Newcomen and Watt
Industrial organization before and after 1760
The textiles industry: Invention and production
The railroad revolution in transportation
The nature and causes of the industrial revolution
Physiocrats, Adam Smith and Laissez-faire economics
Jeremy Bentham: Philosopher of the Industrial Revolution

ROMANTICISM AND THE ENERGY CONCEPT

The romantic outlook and its expression
The roots of the energy concept
Naturphilosophie and the primordial power
Romanticism and electricity
Electricity from Volta to Faraday
James Prescott Joule and the mechanical equivalent of heat
The energy law and late 19th cent positivism
Ernest Mach: Prophet of positivism

SCIENCE, HUMAN NATURE AND SOCIETY

August Comte: Positivism and sociology
The origins of the statistical method in the social sciences
Social physics and political arithmetics
Phrenology and human differences
Marx Weber, history and sociology
Emile Durkheim's studies on suicide

On the origin(s) of the races and human diversity
The myth of the superiority of the Aryan race
Criminal anthropology: from Beccaria to Lombroso

DARWIN, EVOLUTION AND HUMAN NATURE

18th cent natural history and the species problem
Darwin's exposure to various ideas
Evidence for descent with modification
The origin of the species
Reception and controversy
British evolutionary anthropology
Herbert Spencer and social Darwinism
Eugenics: Artificial selection of human nature?

UNDERSTANDING HUMAN (UN)CONSCIOUSNESS

Wundt's Ganzheit psychology and volkerpsychologie
Challenges to the psychology of consciousness
Freud and the discovery of the unconscious
The transformation of psychoanalysis: Rank, Jung and Adler
Discovery of subjectivity: Phenomenology & existentialism

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND 20TH CENTURY SOCIETY

The technological utopias
Technology and gender: The industrial revolution in the home
Science, technology and social change: Contrasting views

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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